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Communal Societies, Vol. 18, 1998

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Communal Societies, Vol. 18

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Contents

  • JAN MARTIN BANGS, Challenge and Response: The Environmental Crisis and the Kibbutz Movement, 1
  • JOHN GAL, Pensions on the Kibbutz: The Implications of the Undermining of Social Security for the Aged in Communal Societies, 9
  • ELIZABETH A. DEWOLFE, “So Much They Have Got for Their Folly”: Shaker apostates and the Tale of Woe, 21
  • SUZANNE THURMAN, “No Idle Hands Are Seen”: The Social Construction of Work in Shaker Communities, 36
  • DENISE SEACHRIST, Musical Treasures of the Snow Hill Cloister: Manuscripts, Monographs, and Monastical Mysteries, 53
  • PETER HOEHNLE, With Malice Toward None: The Inspirationist Response to the Civil War, 1860-1865, 62
  • J. EUGENE CLAY, Russian Israel, 81
  • TARA MCCARTHY, The Medium of Grace: Mutual Criticism in the Oneida Community, 92

Reviews

  • BARBARA A. MATHIEU, Hutterite Beginnings: Communitarian Experiments during the Reformation, by Werner O. Packull, 107
  • LANNY HALDY, Origins of the Shakers: From the Old World to the New World,by Clarke Garrett, 109
  • SUSAN LOVE BROWN, Interracialism and Christian Community in the Postwar South: The Story of Koinonia Farm, by Tracy Elaine K’Meyer, 111
  • GARY L. HEWITT, A Separate Canaan: The Making of an Afro-Moravian World in North Carolina, 1763-1840, by Jon F. Sensbach, 113
  • JO ANN MCNAMARA, Building Sisterhood: A Feminist History of the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, by Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, 115
  • JONATHAN G. ANDELSON, Gaviotas: A Village to Reinvent the World, by Alan Weisman, 116

Cover

The Snow Hill Society was the long-lived daughter colony of the more noted Ephrata Society of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Snow Hill was sited on the southern outskirts of the village of Quincy, Pennsylvania (north of Waynesboro) in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. It flourished from the late 18th century to the late 19th century, numbering at its height some forty celibate brothers and sisters.