Hidden Collections Grant Application Form

Oneida diitization project

Hamilton College student Leah Gianlanella catalogs the book collection of the
Oneida Mansion House. Photo courtesy of the Oneida Mansion House Museum.

The Communal Studies Association will award each year to an established institution (historic site/library) or organized group (the group must have either a Federal ID number or a state tax ID number) up to $2,500 to preserve, through either microfilming or digital imaging, the documents of a communal group.  The grant is given yearly.  Applications are online only.  Winners are encouraged to use these preserved documents in a presentation at a CSA annual conference.  The collection must be a “hidden collection,” and cannot be already available digitally to the public (these funds can, however, be used to digitize already microfilmed items).  The created digital images must be made available to the general public via a public website.  If the grant is used for microfilming, a copy of the microfilm must be given to the Communal Studies Association upon completion of the work.  The Communal Studies Association must be recognized as a funding source on the website, or on a title card on any microfilm.  The organization must show a dollar (not in-kind) match of 50% of the grant request.  If the grant is approved, the grantee receives 50% of the request upon acceptance, and the remainder upon evidence of successful completion of the work.

Deadline: September 1st each year. Grantee will be notified by October 1st.

 

Hidden Collections Grant Application Form

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Project Information

Include a description of what items will be digitized, the documents’ significance to the history of communalism and of the group, the size (in number of items or in linear feet) of the collection to be digitized. After digitization or microfilming, how will the original documents be preserved?
Format to be used, size of files to be created, equipment to be used, who will do the work. Include a timeline. Will this project be primarily for preservation of the documents or primarily for access by scholars?

Include labor costs and/or any equipment to be purchased, with separate columns for grant request and dollar match.
Will project include metadata, descriptions, context, attributions, ownership, and provenance?
Who hosts the website, can it accommodate a large amount of data? Back-up? Succession of ownership of data if the website no longer active?


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